Gorka Larrañaga

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Arqueología urbana
Oil on canvas
120 x 90 cm
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Chuleta
Oil, acrylic and objects under methacrylate
80 x 60 x 5 cm
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Jostailuak / huellas de la basura
Methacrylate boxes, objects, silicone, acrylic and oil
210 x 150 x 35 cm
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Jostailuak / huellas de la basura
Methacrylate boxes, objects, silicone, acrylic and oil
210 x 150 x 35 cm
Click for larger image
Jostailuak / huellas de la basura
Methacrylate boxes, objects, silicone, acrylic and oil
210 x 150 x 35 cm
Click for larger image
Jostailuak / huellas de la basura
Methacrylate boxes, objects, silicone, acrylic and oil
210 x 150 x 35 cm

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The artist’s interaction with his immediate environment regarding urban spaces that make up daily life lends Larrañaga’s work a plural taste of inquisitive originality; for this purpose, Gorka recycles objects and advertising brochures from his city wandering to create pictorial-photographic-sculptural works that constantly verge on abstraction and create open spaces for the viewer.

Mexico City’s valley, with its large dimensions, seems as an exaggeration of any possible form for any other city. That is why its inhabitants call it the monster city: “I’ve had to put up with it, I’ve had to live it, I’ve had to feel it… and sometimes, I’ve hated it, because Mexico City is a city without pedestrians… and I am a pedestrian…”

This look’s approach is placed between the universe of the enthusiasm and the overflowing excitement that the city causes, where One and All dissolve and cancel each other to finally define themselves in the context of what Mexico City means. Uncovering its unfathomable mysteries is one of the purposes of this project.

Curriculum Vitae

Eduardo Rincón

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MM11C 5.Varias técnicas con semillas o frutos, hilo y tinta. 25 X 25 x 5 cm
CUERNO Y BEJUCO
Horn and bejuco
18 x 30 x 60 cm

MM11C 6. Varias técnicas con semillas o frutos, hilo y tinta. 25 X 25 x 5 cm

CUERNOS CON HILO DE ALGODON
Horns, fruit parts and cotton thread
19 x 14 x 29 cm

MM11C M. Varias técnicas con semillas o frutos, hilo y tinta. 37 X 47 x 5 cm
GUAJE HILADO
Bottle gourd and Hemp thread
14 x 14 x 35 cm
Terra Viridis 63. 2010. Oil on canvas. 120 x 200cm.
Terra Viridis 63
Oil on canvas
120 x 200cm
Terra Viridis 63. 2010. Óleo sobre tela. 120 x 200cm.
Serie S11
Oil on canvas
155 x 225 cm
2013
Terra Viridis 63. 2010. Óleo sobre tela. 120 x 200cm.
Terra Viridis 71
Oil on canvas
190 x 250 cm
2011

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Eduardo Rincón’s work is based on biological, natural and organic processes that present a reflection on the natural forces that manifest in the form and development of plants. He produces plants experimentally at his workshop and nursery that he later uses for installation purposes, sculpture, drawing and painting. He has taken his research on native trees to reforestation projects.

This artist’s work may be considered as object painting since his work includes objects produced by nature: flowers, seeds and plants that he adds to his pictorial techniques as a real element that opposes to the illusion of image.

Art-Object rises simple, every day objects to the dignity of art as proof that art is, first and foremost, a mental attitude that lives in the mind of the viewer. By exhibiting these paintings/objects, aesthetic qualities may be appreciated instead of their practical purposes. His work makes us accomplices to a flirtation between two and three-dimensional art, technique and expression, and most importantly, between nature and culture.

Curriculum Vitae

Alfredo Gisholt

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entierro
El Aquelarre
Oil on canvas
183 X 214 cm
silbodegigantes
Silbo de Gigantes
Oil on canvas
214 X 245 cm
lamento
Lamento
Oil on canvas
214 X 183 cm
barrancosdeescaleras
Barrancos de escaleras III
Oil on canvas
120 X 150 cm

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In this show the artist visualizes a reality of Mexico painted from a distant place through a re-signification of western painting symbols, creating a particular fiction. In the midst of the twenty-first century, Gisholt evokes historic references with his paintings: he remembers Goya by painting the same themes, he inserts the light bulb from Picasso’s Guernica using it as a symbol of the symbol. By these means, Gisholt activates the viewer’s memory, causing a fantasy. Although his work draws inspiration from Mexico’s reality, his pictorial language is not folkloristic; he re-signifies each symbol into a new context to visualize a human reality that he finds in his country. His vision is anything but conservative. He uses painting to question the limits of painting itself. He summons its possibilities; extending his realm of expression, with clustered compositions, with strident and tropical colors next to grey and urban hues, with re-interpreted topics and symbols, with contrasting pictorial trends within the same work.

Curriculum